Extreme heat that put 150 million people in the United States under warning killed dozens in NASA photos

The huge impact of extreme heat – a weather phenomenon that has killed more people in the United States than any other – is revealed in new animated maps from Nasa which show how the triple-digit weather spread and put 150 million people on alert in July.

Temperatures have regularly topped 90 and 100 degrees, with Newark experiencing a record five consecutive triple-digit heat days for the first time and states including Texas and Oklahoma see spikes up to 115 degrees. Utah residents have been choking on a 16-day streak of temperatures above 100 degrees.

Dated Centers for Disease Control and prevention shows that extreme heat is the nation’s deadliest weather phenomenon, killing more people each year than tornadoes, hurricanes or floods.

Data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that extreme heat is the nation’s deadliest weather phenomenon, killing more people each year than tornadoes, hurricanes or floods. The image above shows the maximum daily surface air temperature over most of the Western Hemisphere in July 2022

The NASA map shown above shows daily high temperatures in the United States on July 31, 2022. In late July, heat continued across the Great Plains and Southeast, while increasing in the West and the North-east.

The NASA map shown above shows daily high temperatures in the United States on July 31, 2022. In late July, heat continued across the Great Plains and Southeast, while increasing in the West and the North-east.

According to the agency, an average of 702 people die each year from heat-related causes in the United States, with another 67,500 people going to the emergency room and 9,200 hospitalized.

Meanwhile, heat-related deaths are on the rise across the country as agencies scramble to catalog exactly how many people died during July’s heatwaves.

In Tarrant County, Texas, which is experiencing its second hottest July in its history, at least 12 people have died, 10 of whom are in buildings without air conditioning or in which the air conditioning was turned off or not working .

At least 14 deaths in Oregon have been linked to the heat wave, and several heat-related deaths have been reported in New York, New Jersey and other states.

At least 14 deaths in Oregon have been linked to the heat wave, and several heat-related deaths have been reported in New York, New Jersey and other states.  Pictured above: A homeless man with symptoms of heat exhaustion gets emotional as an EMT firefighter from the Shoreline Fire Department treats him in Shoreline, Washington

At least 14 deaths in Oregon have been linked to the heat wave, and several heat-related deaths have been reported in New York, New Jersey and other states. Pictured above: A homeless man with symptoms of heat exhaustion gets emotional as an EMT firefighter from the Shoreline Fire Department treats him in Shoreline, Washington

Excessive heat warnings were issued in the United States in July.  Pictured above, Peter Christen helps his wife Shera float at the Emancipation Pool on July 19, 2022 in Houston

Excessive heat warnings were issued in the United States in July. Pictured above, Peter Christen helps his wife Shera float at the Emancipation Pool on July 19, 2022 in Houston

Heat-related deaths aren't the only concern during heat waves.  Heat exhaustion, which can lead to heatstroke, can lead to brain damage or even death, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.  Pictured above: A woman takes a sip of a drink in Domino Park, Brooklyn

Heat-related deaths aren’t the only concern during heat waves. Heat exhaustion, which can lead to heatstroke, can lead to brain damage or even death, according to the Department of Health and Human Services. Pictured above: A woman takes a sip of a drink in Domino Park, Brooklyn

A spokesperson for the CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics told DailyMail.com that heat-related death data is not yet available for July. They noted that 18 heat-related deaths were reported in May and June, but said those numbers were “incomplete”.

Heat can be a health hazard in several ways. Heat exhaustion, which can lead to heatstroke, can lead to brain damage or even death, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.

Exposure to hot weather is also linked to an increased risk of hospitalization for people with heart disease, worsening asthma symptoms, dehydration, and even high levels of violent crime and suicide.

It’s the second year in a row that some Americans have battled the sweltering weather. Last year, a heat wave swept through the Pacific Northwest, killing 116 people in Oregon and 112 in Washington, making it the deadliest weather event in that state’s history.

Due to the effects of climate change, the CDC warns that these incredibly hot summers are likely to become the new normal.

“Extreme summer heat is increasing in the United States. Climate projections indicate that extreme heat events will be more frequent and intense over the coming decades,” the CDC wrote on its website.

“However, some heat-related illness and death risks have declined over the past few decades, possibly due to better forecasting, heat-early warning systems, and increased access to air conditioning. Despite this, extreme heat events remain a preventable cause of death nationwide.

The extreme weather conditions this summer extended not only to United Statesbut the whole world, with thousands of deaths in Europe and Asia, while the two continents faced day after day with record temperatures.