Does Taylor Swift deserve criticism for her private jet habits?

Taylor Swift hit the securities this week, when she was named “the biggest CO2 polluting celebrity of the year”.

Swift’s private jet was used for 170 of the first 200 days of the year and emitted 8,293.54 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) – 1,184.8 times what a normal person emits each year, according to a report by sustainable marketing firm Yard.

A spokesperson for the Grammy-winning singer said Swift’s jet is “regularly loaned to other people” and “attributing most or all of those trips to her is patently incorrect.”

However, many people have adopted Twitter to criticize her, with one saying that 170 thefts is an “odious amount in a short time”.

But does Swift really deserve this criticism?

in a new reportNortheastern University scholars say focusing on the carbon footprint of individual celebrities shifts responsibility away from fossil fuel companies.

However, they said celebrities should always make climate-conscious travel choices, to set an example for their followers.

Swift’s private jet was used for 170 of the first 200 days of the year and emitted 8,293.54 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) – 1,184.8 times what a normal person emits each year, according to a report by sustainable marketing firm Yard

Hollywood’s biggest CO2 emitters
Last name Number of flights in 2022 Tons of CO2
Taylor Swift 170 8,293
Floyd Mayweather 177 7,076
Jay Z 136 6,981
Alex Rodriguez 106 5,342
Blake Shelton 111 4,495
Steven Spielberg 61 4,465
Kim Kardashian 57 4,268
Mark Wahlberg 101 3,772
Oprah Winfrey 68 3,493
Travis Scott N / A 3,033

In their new report, the researchers acknowledge that the controversy surrounding Swift’s CO2 emissions has been a great opportunity to draw attention to the ethics of flight.

Dr Laura Kuhl, assistant professor of public policy and urban affairs and international affairs at Northeastern, said: “I think it’s great that attention is being paid to the issue of ethical considerations of flight.

“The impacts of theft, even if it’s commercial flights, are really, really high.”

While the majority (57%) of transportation emissions in the United States come from cars, theft accounts for 8% of emissions, according to the researchers.

Compared to commercial flights, private jets are highly inefficient – both due to the length of flights they tend to operate and the number of passengers.

A spokesperson for the Grammy-winning singer said that

A spokesperson for the Grammy-winning singer said Swift’s “jet is regularly loaned to other people” and “attributing most or all of those trips to her is clearly incorrect.” Here she is pictured with her mother in her private jet

Most emitting companies

Owned by investors:

  • ExxonMobil
  • Shell
  • BP
  • Chevron
  • Peabody
  • total
  • BHP Billiton

Statepossesses:

  • Saudi Arabia
  • Gazprom
  • Iranian national oil
  • Coal India
  • pemex
  • CNPC (PetroChina)

Source: Carbon Majors Report

Dr Kuhl points out that many private jet flights are relatively short, some, like Kylie Jenner’s flight on Sundaylasting a few minutes.

The majority of emissions are generated during take-off and landing, making these short flights particularly inefficient.

“There’s really no circumstance where flying is more effective than driving,” Dr. Kuhl said.

However, researchers say focusing on the carbon footprint of individual celebrities shifts blame away from the main driver of CO2 emissions – fossil fuel companies.

“It is true that the majority of emissions are generated by a small number of fossil fuel companies that direct the supply of fossil fuels,” Dr Kuhl said.

“We absolutely must not lose sight of the need to put regulations in place.”

A 2017 report, titled Key Carbon Emissions Reportrevealed that just 100 companies are responsible for 71% of global carbon emissions.

Companies like ExxonMobil, Shell, BP and Chevron have been the biggest emitters since 1988, according to the report.

However, rather than taking responsibility for these emissions, many of these companies are blaming consumers, according to Dr. Kuhl.

She points to the fact that the term ‘carbon footprint’ was coined by British Petroleum in 2004 to describe how individual actions fuel climate change.

“They wanted to push the issue on consumers, of individual responsibility,” Dr. Kuhl said.

Overall, Dr Kuhl says she doesn’t think taking responsibility for carbon emissions is an “either/or” situation.

“We have to approach it from all directions,” she said.

Alexandra Meise, associate professor at the Northeastern School of Law, added, “Individuals may not be able to make the same contribution, but that doesn’t mean individuals can’t make a difference.

“If we’re going to meet the targets that experts say are necessary to keep global temperature rise below that magical 1.5 degrees Celsius that they’re calling to avoid cataclysmic consequences, then we need everything we can. obtain.”

WHAT ARE THE UK’S PLANS FOR ‘NET ZERO’ CARBON EMISSIONS?

Plans for the UK to become carbon neutral by 2050 have been published by Therese Maygovernment of June 12, 2019.

However, experts are concerned about how the proposals will work.

The report pledges to ensure that emissions generated by the UK are offset by removing the same amount of carbon from the atmosphere.

There are two main ways to do this: by planting more trees and by installing “carbon capture” technology at the source of the pollution.

Some critics fear that this first option will be used by the government to export its carbon offset to other countries.

International carbon credits allow nations to continue emitting carbon while paying for trees to be planted elsewhere, thereby balancing their emissions.

Some argue that the program is a way for developed countries to shirk their environmental obligations, transferring them to poor and developing countries.