Apollo 11 artifacts are among 10,000 memories sent to the moon aboard NASA’s Artemis 1

A small piece of Apollo 11’s engine is among thousands of artifacts that will be sent to the moon when Nasa‘s Artemis 1 will launch at the end of August.

While NASA’s first return mission to the Moon will be unmanned, there will be sentimental cargo from the 1968 Apollo 11 mission on board – including a bolt, nut and washer from one of the Apollo 11 engines. their ship, as well as a small moon rock that was collected by astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin.

Among the thousands of items in the official flight kit, several stand out, including a pen nib used by Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, which was loaned to the mission. Schulz was a well-known enthusiast of lunar missions.

NASA’s first mission to the moon, Artemis 1, will include a bolt, nut and washer (seen above) from one of the Apollo 11 ship’s famous engines

Among the thousands of items in the official flight kit, a pen tip (seen above) used by Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz will be flown to the moon.  The designer was a well-known enthusiast of lunar missions

Among the thousands of items in the official flight kit, a pen tip (seen above) used by Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz will be flown to the moon. The designer was a well-known enthusiast of lunar missions

In the 1960s Schultz drew several comics featuring Snoopy on the moon and now 245 silver Snoopy pins will make the trip for real

In the 1960s Schultz drew several comics featuring Snoopy on the moon and now 245 silver Snoopy pins will make the trip for real

Microchips (seen above) engraved with the names of the nearly 30,000 people who worked on Artemis 1 are part of the mission's official flight kit

Microchips (seen above) engraved with the names of the nearly 30,000 people who worked on Artemis 1 are part of the mission’s official flight kit

In the 1960s Schultz drew several comics featuring Snoopy on the moon and now 245 silver Snoopy pins will make the trip for real.

“We searched the collection to find things that we thought were the right combination of being really meaningful and would have their meaning enhanced by inclusion on this flight, but weren’t things that weren’t. not as somewhat duplicated in the collection,” Margaret Weitekamp, ​​chair of the space history department at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum, said. CollectSpace in an interview.

“We don’t fly objects that we think are completely unique and therefore pose a great risk if put on something like a launch.”

The National Air and Space Museum is lending the mission crest, commemorative medallion and engine room – and all Apollo artifacts will be displayed in an exhibit after they return to Earth.

Emblems and many other items, such as space patches and commemorative medallions (see above), will be presented after the flight to program workers and those who made Artemis I a success.

Emblems and many other items, such as space patches and commemorative medallions (see above), will be presented after the flight to program workers and those who made Artemis I a success.

NASA's first trip to the moon in decades will feature thousands of interesting artifacts, including LEGO minifigures (see above)

NASA’s first trip to the moon in decades will feature thousands of interesting artifacts, including LEGO minifigures (see above)

Microchips engraved with the names of the nearly 30,000 people who worked on Artemis 1 will also be sent as part of the mission’s official flight kit – as a tribute to their hard work and dedication.

Other memorabilia include bright yellow space-themed Lego minifigures, a 3D-printed replica of the Greek goddess Artemis, several USB sticks containing videos, drawings and essays from teachers and students. from around the world and hundreds of US and state flags. as flags of some of NASA’s international collaborators.

There will also be 2,500 Artemis I Mission Pins and 2,775 Artemis I Mission Patches on board, along with many other small tchotchkes that will be distributed as souvenirs to the thousands of people involved in the mission.

A pebble from the Dead Sea, which is the lowest surface of dry land on Earth, will be sent with Artemis as a way to “symbolize humanity’s continued exploration”.

In total, the official flight kit will weigh 120 pounds, which might seem like a lot, but NASA has a long history of sending Earth objects into space.

For example, the moon rock that will be on board Artemis I had already been sent during the space shuttle’s last flight in 2011.

Perhaps most famously, the Voyager probes launched in 1977 both carried gold phonograph records containing greetings to extraterrestrial life and music by Bach, Mozart, Beethoven and Chuck Berry.

In July, NASA announced it aimed to launch Artemis I on its historic three-week voyage on August 29, although September 2 and 5 were set as backup dates. A final decision will likely only be made the week before launch.

Although originally scheduled to take off in November 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic and Hurricane Ida caused long delays, as well as numerous technical issues.

The mission is essentially a test drive of the Orion spacecraft and space launch system. According to the current plan, a successful mission will lead to a manned follow-up in 2024, where four crew members will orbit the moon.

Subsequent missions will see humans walking on the surface of the moon for the first time in 50 years, including the first women to do so.

In July, NASA announced plans to launch Artemis I (above) on its historic three-week voyage on August 29, although September 2 and 5 have been set as backup dates.  A final decision likely won't be made until the week before launch.

In July, NASA announced plans to launch Artemis I (above) on its historic three-week voyage on August 29, although September 2 and 5 have been set as backup dates. A final decision likely won’t be made until the week before launch.

The mission is essentially a test drive of the Orion spacecraft and space launch system.  According to the current plan, a successful mission will lead to a manned follow-up in 2024, where four crew members will orbit the moon.

The mission is essentially a test drive of the Orion spacecraft and space launch system. According to the current plan, a successful mission will lead to a manned follow-up in 2024, where four crew members will orbit the moon.